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December 10, 2022 1:30 am

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Google Alert – Benjamin Netanyahu: Israel’s Benjamin Netanyahu comeback brings despair for leftwing parties – The Guardian

Outgoing coalition suffers poor election result as some parties of the left lose voice in Knesset altogether.

7364040 Google Alert – Benjamin Netanyahu

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German spy chief: ‘Russia is the storm, China is climate change’ – Reuters

German spy chief: ‘Russia is the storm, China is climate change’  Reuters
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New York City psychiatrist Pamela Buchbinder masterminded hit on her ex-lover, judge says

buchbinder-sentencing.jpg

On Oct. 11, 2022, Manhattan psychiatrist Pamela Buchbinder was sentenced to 11 years in prison after admitting her guilt in connection with one of the most bizarre crime stories in New York City history — the brutal and nearly fatal 2012 attack on her ex-lover and the father of her child, Dr. Michael Weiss.

According to authorities, the assault on Weiss in his Manhattan office was the climax of an epic “War of the Roses” battle between two extremely well-educated and respected psychiatrists. “48 Hours” correspondent Peter Van Sant exclusively reports in “The Psychiatrist and The Selfie,” airing Saturday 9/8c on CBS and streaming on Paramount+.

What made the crime even more astonishing, according to Van Sant, was the fact that the alleged “hit man” turned out to be Buchbinder’s troubled young cousin, Jacob Nolan, who claimed that Buchbinder had manipulated him into carrying out the murder for her.

Back in 2012, Buchbinder and Weiss were going through a bitter custody battle over their son, Calder, then 4 years old, and fighting over visitation. Yet, despite their arguing, it turned out Weiss took out a $1.5 million life insurance policy for his son, and gave his mother, Buchbinder, control in the event of Weiss’s death, starting on Nov. 9, 2012.

Jake Nolan and and Dr. Pamela Buchbinder Jake Nolan and and Dr. Pamela Buchbinder

By then, authorities said, Buchbinder allegedly had taken her bipolar cousin under her wing, seemingly to help him deal with his mental health and drug and alcohol issues.  But instead of healing Nolan, the son of a wealthy real estate investor, authorities claimed Buchbinder slowly brainwashed and weaponized him into carrying out the hit.

Buchbinder accompanied Nolan to a local Home Depot on Nov. 11, 2012, where they purchased a sledgehammer, according to authorities. And the following day, Nolan took the sledgehammer and a knife Weiss had given Buchbinder as a gift, and used a map Buchbinder drew of Weiss’s office to surprise him. 

But the assault did not kill Weiss. Instead, the two ended up fighting in the office, with both of them left bloodied, and badly hurt.

According to prosecutors, while they waited for paramedics to arrive to take them to the hospital, Nolan snapped a selfie, which he sent to Buchbinder to show her what happened to him.

Crime scene photos: NYC sledgehammer attack Crime scene photos: NYC sledgehammer attack 13 photos

Nolan’s defense attorney, Steven Brounstein, later said that Nolan was “putty” in Buchbinder’s hand.

And at Nolan’s trial in 2016, Brounstein acknowledged Nolan committed the assault, but he argued that Buchbinder took advantage of Nolan’s fragile and submissive mental health, and therefore was not fully responsible for his actions.

Prosecutors, however, disagreed, insisting that being bipolar did not mean that Nolan did not understand what he was doing, or had been turned into a “babbling idiot who had no control over his facilities.”

In the end, a Manhattan jury took less than an hour to convict Nolan, then 23, and he was sentenced to more than nine years in prison. But his conviction did not end speculation that his older psychiatrist cousin was also responsible for the brutal assault.

In 2017, prosecutors eventually charged Buchbinder in connection with the attack, and she then spent five years on Rikers Island as her lawyers wrangled over the case and the courts were shut down due to the pandemic.

Meanwhile, her high-powered lawyers, Ronald Fishetti, Eric Franz and Monica Nejathaim, claimed Buchbinder was not only innocent, but there were legitimate explanations about her relationship with Nolan, and the evidence against her.

But last September, Buchbinder — looking rail-thin and gaunt — surprised the court by announcing she had reached a deal with prosecutors, and she pleaded guilty to lesser charges in exchange for 11 years in prison.

A month later, however, when she showed up for her routine sentencing, Buchbinder stunned the court again – this time saying she wanted to withdraw her plea. She claimed that on the day she pleaded guilty, she was exposed to mace on Rikers Island, did not take her medication, and inadvertently got a contact high when someone was smoking drugs on her bus ride to court.

Judge Thomas Farber, however, rejected her argument, and continued the sentencing, with Weiss then reading a victim’s impact statement in which he laid out how the attack left him with PTSD, and a fear that Buchbinder’s hatred for him will continue even after she is released from prison.

Then, Manhattan Assistant District Attorney Joel Seidemann took to the podium.

“I think it’s necessary to make the record straight,” Seidemann began. “The defendant tried to have Dr. Michael Weiss murdered … she hated his guts.”

“She sought to destroy him because of their failed relationship,” he continued. “She stood to control $1.5 million in life insurance on his life in the name of his son.”

Buchbinder responded succinctly. “If there was one true statement Mr. Seidemann said, I missed it,” she said.

Pamela Buchbinder sentencing In 2017, Pamela Buchbinder was charged with second-degree attempted murder and first-degree attempted assault. In 2022 (pictured in center) she accepted a deal to spend 11 years in prison, in exchange for pleading guilty to attempted assault and a lesser charge in connection with Dr. Weiss’s attack. Murray Weiss

Finally, Farber sentenced Buchbinder to 11 years and issued an order of protection, but not before he had his say.

“There can be no doubt that if you plot to bash somebody’s head in with a sledgehammer that the intent is to cause his death,” the judge said.

Outside court after Buchbinder was led away in handcuffs, her attorneys said that with time off for good behavior, Buchbinder will be free in 2027 to start her life over, and try to re-establish her relationship with her son.

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Germany’s Scholz in China amid trade, Ukraine, rights issues

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BEIJING (AP) — German Chancellor Olaf Scholz met with Chinese President Xi Jinping in Beijing on Friday for a one-day visit that has drawn criticism over China’s tacit support for Russia in its war on Ukraine and lingering controversies over economic ties and human rights issues.

Scholz, who is traveling with several top German business leaders, received a formal welcome from Xi, who was recently re-appointed head of the ruling Communist Party, at the Great Hall of the People in the heart of Beijing.

Xi noted that Scholz’s visit comes as the sides mark more than 50 years of diplomatic relations dating back to when the countries, despite their fierce Cold War rivalry, relaunched economic exchanges that remain a key part of the relationship to this day.

“At present, the international situation is complex and changeable,” Xi was quoted as saying by state broadcaster CCTV, without specifically mentioning Ukraine. “As influential powers, China and Germany should work together in times of change and chaos to make more contributions to world peace and development.”

In his opening remarks, Scholz referred directly to the conflict that has created millions of refugees and upended world food and energy markets, saying, “We come together at a time of great tension,” according to German news agency DPA.

“In particular, I want to highlight the Russian war against Ukraine, which poses many problems for our rules-based world order,” Scholz was quoted as saying.

Scholz also touched on global hunger, climate change and developing world debt as “important issues,” DPA reported.

Scholz, who relies on a coalition of his Social Democratic Party, the Greens and the Free Democratic Party, has come under criticism for making the visit to China so soon after the 69-year-old Xi’s triumph at last month’s congress, in which he was named to a third five-year term and packed the all-powerful Politburo Standing Committee with committed allies who support his vision of tighter control over society and the economy and a more confrontational approach to the West.

The visit also occurred amid rising tensions over Taiwan and follows a U.N. report that said Chinese human rights violations against Xinjiang’s Uyghurs and other ethnic groups may amount to “crimes against humanity.”

Scholz was accompanied on the trip by about a dozen top German business leaders, including the CEOs of Volkswagen, BMW, BASF, Bayer and Deutsche Bank, most of which are doing a thriving business in China. Scholz will also meet company representatives in Beijing.

That has some German observers questioning whether the country is becoming overly reliant on the Chinese market, just as it did with Russia for energy supplies.

Following lunch, Scholz and his delegation were to meet with Premier Li Keqiang, who nominally has responsibility over China’s economy.

Despite their political disputes, Scholz’s visit reflects the importance of Germany’s trade ties with the world’s second-largest economy.

In an article for the German daily Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, Scholz said he was traveling to Beijing “precisely because business as usual is not an option in this situation.”

“It is clear that if China changes, the way we deal with China must also change,” Scholz said, adding that “we will reduce one-sided dependencies in the spirit of smart diversification.” Scholz also said he would address “difficult issues” such as the rights of ethnic minorities in Xinjiang, who have been detained in large numbers in what the U.S. and others have called a campaign of genocide.

Scholz is the first leader from the G7 group of industrialized nations to meet with Xi since the start of the global COVID-19 pandemic, which was first detected in China in 2019. The diplomatically delicate trip comes as Germany and the European Union work on their strategy toward an increasingly assertive and authoritarian Beijing.

Scholz’s messages will face close scrutiny, particularly at home where some have criticized him for normalizing China’s behavior. While his nearly year-old government has signaled a departure from predecessor Angela Merkel’s firmly trade-first approach, his trip follows domestic discord over a Chinese shipping company’s major investment in a container terminal in Germany’s crucial port of Hamburg.

With China still imposing tough COVID-19 restrictions, his delegation is moving in an anti-virus bubble, undergoing testing and won’t stay in Beijing overnight. At just 11 hours, it is the shortest trip ever to China by a German leader. The aircrew who brought him to Beijing flew to South Korea to wait out the visit and avoid having to be quarantined.

German officials say the trip is intended to probe where China is going and what forms of cooperation are possible.

An official pointed to China’s “particular responsibility” as an ally of Russia to help end the war in Ukraine and press Moscow to tone down its nuclear rhetoric; to concerns over tensions in Taiwan and the broader region; to Germany’s desire for a “level playing field” in economic relations; and to Scholz’s current status as this year’s chair of the Group of Seven industrial powers.

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Ukrainian suicide drone boats packed with bombs are threatening Russia’s once feared Black Sea fleet, and it may not be able to stop them

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It did not annihilate any ships, but the assault on Russia’s Black Sea Fleet — using a swarm of unmanned vehicles in the air and sea — so angered the Kremlin, which dubbed it a “terrorist act,” that it briefly pulled out of a deal to protect grain shipments from Ukraine, in the process threatening food supplies to some of its few remaining allies. 

Kyiv has not taken credit for the hours-long attack, marked by its novel use of armed, unmanned boats powered by jet ski engines, but it is almost certainly responsible. And experts say the relatively minor damage it apparently caused last week at Sevastopol — a city with a critical naval base in Crimea illegally annexed by Moscow in 2014 — should not obscure the strategic importance of cheaply but effectively demonstrating that nowhere is safe for Russian forces.

“It’s partly a PR victory for Ukraine,” Bryan Clark, a retired US Navy officer and expert on autonomous weapons at the Hudson Institute, told Insider. “But it’s also going to force the Russians to put some kind of defensive measures in place.”

“It’s a way of throwing sand in the gears of the Russian military operation,” he continued, “because now Russia has to spend money and time and people defending something that they previously thought was not under threat.”

—Rob Lee (@RALee85) October 29, 2022

Following the attack on the USS Cole in 2000, when extremists rammed an explosive-laden ship into the side of the American destroyer during a refueling stop in Yemen, the United States was put on notice that its naval assets could be harmed by a massively outgunned adversary. Today US ships at port are protected by harbor sentry boats as well as a floating security barrier that prevents small craft from approaching.

“This is the first time you’ve seen a naval drone be employed as part of a direct attack on a ship and actually cause some damage,” Clark said. “The Russians now are going to have to respect this threat and put fencing up, put floating security barriers up, put some watchstanders [sentries] up and arm them. It imposes a tax, if you will, on the Russians.”

Russia has not, to date, taken such steps to protect its Black Sea Fleet, a force which has participated in the missile barrages of Ukraine and lost its flagship in another stunning Ukrainian attack. That failure could be due to hubris — thinking Crimea is as safe as Russia proper. But it has now had its own USS Cole moment, one that reflects the dramatic strides in and easy accessibility of off-the-shelf technology.

“You can really create this thing from scratch — yourself,” Clark said.

Russian Navy cruiser Moskva in Sevastopol Crimea

Russian Navy missile cruiser Moskva docked in the bay of the Crimean city of Sevastopol, March 30, 2014. It was sunk in April after a Ukrainian attack. OLGA MALTSEVA/AFP via Getty Images

The ‘evolution’ of naval warfare

It could also give Russia pause should it consider another assault on the port city of Odesa. Nothing powered by a jet ski engine is going to be able to match the speed and range of a Russian ship at sea; when Ukraine sunk the cruiser Moskva, the former flagship of Russia’s Black Sea Fleet, it did so with a cruise missile. But a cluster of naval drones can wreak havoc when those ships approach the coast.

Stacie Pettyjohn, a senior fellow and director of the Defense Program at the Center for a New American Security, said Ukraine has already shown with its Sevastopol attack that it can threaten Russia’s navy despite losing most of its own naval assets when Russia took Crimea.

“It was really impressive from the perspective of the fact that the Ukrainians coordinated with these seven unmanned surface vehicles and, at the same time, had unmanned aerial vehicles attacking the base and the port simultaneously, which shows a good degree of coordination and discipline,” Pettyjohn told Insider. 

Russian commanders, from here on out, might now “limit what parts of the Black Sea that they’re patrolling,” she noted, forcing Moscow to rely more on its dwindling supply of long-range cruise missiles to strike at targets in Ukraine.

Naval drones won’t fundamentally alter the course of the conflict in Ukraine.. “It does give the Ukrainians a good capability that they can use,” Pettyjohn said. But, ultimately: “I’d say it’s more of an evolution than a revolution.”

Have a news tip? Email this reporter: cdavis@insider.com

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Michael Novakhov - SharedNewsLinks℠

Ukrainian suicide drone boats packed with bombs are threatening Russia’s once feared Black Sea fleet, and it may not be able to stop them


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from Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines.

  • Ukraine last week appeared to attack Russia’s Black Sea Fleet using a swarm of naval and aerial drones.

  • Russia labeled the attack a “terrorist act” and briefly suspended a deal on grain shipments.

  • Experts told Insider the attack demonstrates that nowhere is safe for Russia’s naval assets.

It did not annihilate any ships, but the assault on Russia’s Black Sea Fleet — using a swarm of unmanned vehicles in the air and sea — so angered the Kremlin, which dubbed it a “terrorist act,” that it briefly pulled out of a deal to protect grain shipments from Ukraine, in the process threatening food supplies to some of its few remaining allies.

Kyiv has not taken credit for the hours-long attack, marked by its novel use of armed, unmanned boats powered by jet ski engines, but it is almost certainly responsible. And experts say the relatively minor damage it apparently caused last week at Sevastopol — a city with a critical naval base in Crimea illegally annexed by Moscow in 2014 — should not obscure the strategic importance of cheaply but effectively demonstrating that nowhere is safe for Russian forces.

“It’s partly a PR victory for Ukraine,” Bryan Clark, a retired US Navy officer and expert on autonomous weapons at the Hudson Institute, told Insider. “But it’s also going to force the Russians to put some kind of defensive measures in place.”

“It’s a way of throwing sand in the gears of the Russian military operation,” he continued, “because now Russia has to spend money and time and people defending something that they previously thought was not under threat.”

Following the attack on the USS Cole in 2000, when extremists rammed an explosive-laden ship into the side of the American destroyer during a refueling stop in Yemen, the United States was put on notice that its naval assets could be harmed by a massively outgunned adversary. Today US ships at port are protected by harbor sentry boats as well as a floating security barrier that prevents small craft from approaching.

“This is the first time you’ve seen a naval drone be employed as part of a direct attack on a ship and actually cause some damage,” Clark said. “The Russians now are going to have to respect this threat and put fencing up, put floating security barriers up, put some watchstanders [sentries] up and arm them. It imposes a tax, if you will, on the Russians.”

Russia has not, to date, taken such steps to protect its Black Sea Fleet, a force which has participated in the missile barrages of Ukraine and lost its flagship in another stunning Ukrainian attack. That failure could be due to hubris — thinking Crimea is as safe as Russia proper. But it has now had its own USS Cole moment, one that reflects the dramatic strides in and easy accessibility of off-the-shelf technology.

“You can really create this thing from scratch — yourself,” Clark said.

It could also give Russia pause should it consider another assault on the port city of Odesa. Nothing powered by a jet ski engine is going to be able to match the speed and range of a Russian ship at sea; when Ukraine sunk the cruiser Moskva, the former flagship of Russia’s Black Sea Fleet, it did so with a cruise missile. But a cluster of naval drones can wreak havoc when those ships approach the coast.

Stacie Pettyjohn, a senior fellow and director of the Defense Program at the Center for a New American Security, said Ukraine has already shown with its Sevastopol attack that it can threaten Russia’s navy despite losing most of its own naval assets when Russia took Crimea.

“It was really impressive from the perspective of the fact that the Ukrainians coordinated with these seven unmanned surface vehicles and, at the same time, had unmanned aerial vehicles attacking the base and the port simultaneously, which shows a good degree of coordination and discipline,” Pettyjohn told Insider.

Russian commanders, from here on out, might now “limit what parts of the Black Sea that they’re patrolling,” she noted, forcing Moscow to rely more on its dwindling supply of long-range cruise missiles to strike at targets in Ukraine.

Naval drones won’t fundamentally alter the course of the conflict in Ukraine.. “It does give the Ukrainians a good capability that they can use,” Pettyjohn said. But, ultimately: “I’d say it’s more of an evolution than a revolution.”

Have a news tip? Email this reporter: cdavis@insider.com

Read the original article on Business Insider